Electronic Archives of Liberal Religion

Religious Freedom
Home Documents Sermons Links Search How to help
 

Home
Up
Sermons
Links
Search
How to help


An Act for establishing Religious Freedom [I779], passed in the Assembly of Virginia in the beginning of the year 1786

Thomas Jefferson

Well aware that Almighty God hath created the mind free; that all attempts to influence it by temporal punishments or burdens, or by civil incapacitations, tend only to beget habits of hypocrisy and meanness, and are a departure from the plan of the Holy Author of our religion, who being Lord both of body and mind, yet chose not to propagate it by coercions on either, as was in his Almighty power to do; that the impious presumption of legislators and rulers, civil as well as ecclesiastical, who, being themselves but fallible and uninspired men have assumed dominion over the faith of others, setting up their own opinions and modes of thinking as the only true and infallible, and as such endeavoring to impose them on others hath established and maintained false religions over the greatest part of the world, and through all time; that to compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves, is sinful and tyrannical; that even the forcing him to support this or tha.... [missing text]

Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly, That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions of belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in nowise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.

And though we well know this Assembly, elected by the people for the ordinary purposes of legislation only, have no power to restrain the acts of succeeding assemblies, constituted with the powers equal to our own, and that therefore to declare this act irrevocable, would be of no effect in law, yet we are free to declare, and do declare, that the rights hereby asserted are of the natural rights of mankind, and that if any act shall be hereafter passed to repeal the present or to narrow its operation such act will be an infringement of natural right.

 

Home Up Next

Home ] Up ] Sermons ] Links ] Search ] How to help ] [ Religious Freedom ] A Short Essay on Universalism ] The Transient and Permanent ] Adler on Emerson ] Ethical Manifold ] Supreme Ethical Rule ] Religious Fellowship ] Felix Adler: Ethical Significance of Easter ] To Be Spiritual ] Humanist Manifesto 1 ]

1998-2002 Jone Johnson Lewis.   All rights reserved.
Comments and questions on this site: please send an email to archives1@jjnet.com

JJL